Expats in Tbilisi - Georgian Food

The Georgian cuisine has similarities with Persian and Caucasus cuisine but still is very unique, delicious and full of flavors. Georgian food is delicious, rich with meat and full of calories. The traditional feast supra is offered spontaneously to relatives, friends or just guests. The most important is that the dinner table is full of food variety. A lot of wine is consumed during the supra and every supra has its tamada (toastmaster), who tells the toast and entertains the guests. 

Khinkali

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Khinkali - probably every nation has its own dumplings, these are Georgian ones. They are quite big in size and filled with meat and its juices. The art of eating khinkali is about consuming them without splashing the juices all over your plate (and yourself).

  • Prep time: 1
  • Cook time: 
  • Total time: 
  • Yield: 10 servings
  • Serving size: 10 pieces
  • Calories per serving: 1166 cal
  • Fat per serving: 40 g
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Georgian Wine

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Georgians say that their country is the birthplace of wine. Indeed, Georgia is among the oldest wine regions in the world - grapevines were cultivated here as long as over 8000 years ago. Even the unique Georgian alphabet is said to be modeled after the shape of the vines curly offshoots. Up to 500 indigenous grape varieties are still cultivated there. Wine is a part of Georgian heritage, including architecture, poetry, and songs, and is associated with celebrations, holidays, rituals as well as with the Christian Orthodox Church. The traditional Georgian winemaking technology using "kvevri" (huge, amphora-shaped, clay vessel placed in the ground) was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List.

 

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Kubdari

Kubdari (Georgian: კუბდარი) is a meat filled pastry that originates from Svaneti region. It can be made with either beef or pork but the most popular version uses mix of both. Originally it should be made with finely chopped and not minced meat.

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Chakapuli

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Chakapuli (Georgian: ჩაქაფული) is a popular Georgian seasonal stew made with lamb or beef, dry white wine, tkemali and greens. It is seasonal because of “tkemali” – the unripe, green, sour plums sold only in the Spring and early Summer.

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Chicken Tabaka

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Pressed fried chicken.

A lot of recipes could be found online. We took the easiest one. In my childhood, every time we were in Moscow at the main Train Station, we ordered chicken in one of the Georgian Fast food restaurants. To prepare the dish you need to buy a very young hen. The only place where you can buy a young hen is a farmer market. The hen must be no more than 500g. You also need a heavyweight for cooking, a stone or a pot filled with water. The heavyweight supposed to press the hen to the bottom of the pan.

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Chakhokhbili

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Chakhokhbili -Georgian Chicken with Herbs. The name comes from the Georgian word “khokhobi” which means “pheasant,” but nowadays it is most usually made with chicken.

The national bird of Georgia is Common Pheasant Phasianus, from which originally was cooked chakhokhbili. Later the recipe spread throughout the Caucasus. It’s not that easy to get a pheasant, as long as you are not a  hunter. So here I share how to cook chakhokhbili from chicken. 

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Eggplant with walnuts

This dish is served as an appetizer probably in all Georgian restaurants. It can be served either as a separate dish or as a part of “pkhali” assortment. It differs from restaurant to restaurant and everybody can pick their favorite way of preparing it. The recipe below is a variation that can be changed by adding/omitting/changing the number of spices to pick the favorite combination.

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